Art Installation

Event

Art Installation

  • 9th Jul - 20th Jul

Because of her, we can!

For at least 65,000 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have carried their dreaming stories, songlines, languages and knowledge that have kept the Aboriginal culture strong and enriched as the oldest continuing culture on the planet. We are proud to showcase three influential Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who have had significant influence in driving change for Aboriginal children and women across Australia

Sue Blacklock AM
Sue Blacklock is a respected elder of the Nucoorilma people of the Gamilaraay nation. Sue is a passionate campaigner for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and has been a lifelong advocate for finding new strength based ways of working with Aboriginal children and families. Aunty Sue was appointed the first Ambassador for Children, Australian Centre for Child Protection in 2014.

Rosalie Kunoth-Monks
An Anmatjere women and NAIDOC Person of the year in 2015, Rosalie has had a major impact on the nation’s culture, political and social life for more than half a century, driving social justice and equality for her people. Rosalie is also an advocate for better housing, medical care and education for Indigenous Australians and a tireless anti-racism campaigner. In 2007, she was presented with the Northern Territory Tribute to Women award for working for the rights of Indigenous Women across Australia.

Nakia Davis-Welsh
Nakia is a Dunghatti women and at 22, her remarkable accomplishments are forging the way for Indigenous women in the game of league as one of the first players to take part in the women’s match under the State of Origin banner. Nakia aims to influence women across the country, no matter their ages, skill or ethnicity to help drive awareness of the importance of being active, supporting the Girls Make Your Move campaign.

Art Installation

Monday 9 - Wednesday 11 July
Ground level near Sass & Bide

Installation by Noni Cragg